Mental Health Emergencies

Patients Quickly Seen by Emergency Physicians, Psychiatrists and other Mental Health Professionals

Separate Behavioral Health Emergency Suite Provides Privacy

There is no better choice for emergency behavioral healthcare than Bergen Regional Medical Center

All Your Healhcare Needs

All Your Healthcare Needs
In One Convenient Location

See a primary care physician or one of our more than 20 specialists; have diagnostic testing performed including MRI and mammography on state of the art equipment; Get laboratory work done; receive physical therapy and have your prescriptions filled all at one location. Learn more about BRMC services.

Mental Health

Many people feel “blue”, sad or upset with the day to day challenges of life. These feelings usually subside. However if feelings of despair and emptiness have overwhelmed your life and won't go away, you may have depression. Depression is a very severe illness. Effective treatments exist, please seek help.
The Access Center can provide assistance.

Three Divisions of Care, One Commitment to Excellence.

Three Divisions of Care, One Commitment to Excellence.

Bergen Regional Medical Center provides a comprehensive set of quality services including Long Term Care, Behavioral Health Care and Acute Care to the Bergen County community.

Long Term Care at BRMC

Quality of Care, Quality of Life

The Long Term Care Division at BRMC is accredited by the Joint Commission. Less than 6% of LTC facilities nationwide pursue and receive Joint Commission accreditation. Learn More

Evergreen Substance Abuse Treatment Center at BRMC

Evergreen Substance Abuse Treatment Center

Evergreen’s full range of services includes Inpatient Detoxification, Residential Treatment, Partial Hospital Programming and Intensive Outpatient Programming. Learn More

Acute Rehabilitation at BRMC

Acute Medical Services

The BRMC Acute Rehabilitation Department provides physical therapy, occupational therapy and speech language pathology services. Patients can be referred to any of these services by their physician. Learn More

Three Divisions of Care...One Commitment to Excellence.

Long Term Care | Behavioral Health Services | Acute Care

Located at 230 East Ridgewood Avenue in Paramus, NJ, Bergen Regional Medical Center provides a comprehensive set of quality services including Long Term Care, Behavioral Health Care and Acute Care to the Bergen County community. Bergen Regional is both the largest hospital with 1,070 beds and the largest licensed nursing home in New Jersey.

The entire Medical Center, including its Long Term Care Division, is fully accredited by the Joint Commission. Less than 6% of Long Term Care facilities nationwide pursue and receive Joint Commission accreditation.

Additionally, with 323 beds, Bergen Regional is one of the largest medical resources providing a continuum of care for the behavioral health community and is a safety net provider for the mentally impaired, elderly, uninsured or underinsured for the state of New Jersey. BRMC also provides services for those eligible for health insurance or Medicaid under the Affordable Care Act.

As a complement to its long term care and behavioral health/substance abuse expertise, Bergen Regional also offers acute medical services including: 24/7 emergency department; surgical suites; physical rehabilitation; pharmacy; laboratory; radiologic services (including digital mammography) and more than 20 ambulatory specialties available through the BRMC Clinic. You can have all of your outpatient healthcare needs fulfilled in one convenient location.

Whatever your medical or mental health needs, Bergen Regional Medical Center is committed to providing you or your loved one with compassionate and quality care.

What Is Seasonal Affective Disorder (SAD)?

Source: Web MD

Seasonal affective disorder, or SAD, is a type of depression that occurs during the same season each year. You may have SAD if you felt depressed during the last two winters but felt much better in spring and summer. While some people look forward to the brisk days of fall and winter, anticipating family dinners and cozy nights by the fire, others dread the cooler temperatures and shorter days. If history repeats, they know that the winter season will bring, like clockwork, worsening symptoms of depression. Up to 3% of the population in the U.S. may suffer from winter depression, which experts term seasonal affective disorder, or SAD.

Anyone can get SAD, but it's more common in:

  • People who live far from the equator, where winter daylight hours are very short.
  • People between the ages of 15 and 55. The risk of getting SAD for the first time goes down as you age.
  • People who have a close relative with SAD.

What causes SAD?
Experts aren't sure what causes SAD. But they think it may be caused by a lack of sunlight. Lack of light may:

  • Upset your "biological clock," which controls your sleep-wake pattern and other circadian rhythms.
  • Cause problems with serotonin, a brain chemical that affects mood.

What are the symptoms?
If you have SAD, you may:

  • Feel sad, grumpy, moody, or anxious.
  • Lose interest in your usual activities.
  • Eat more and crave carbohydrates, such as bread and pasta.
  • Gain weight.
  • Sleep more but still feel tired.
  • Have trouble concentrating.

Symptoms come and go at about the same time each year. Most people with SAD start to have symptoms in September or October and feel better by April or May.

How is SAD diagnosed?
It can sometimes be hard to tell the difference between SAD and other types of depression because many of the symptoms are the same. To diagnose SAD, your doctor will ask if:

  • You have been depressed during the same season and have gotten better when the seasons changed for at least 2 years in a row.
  • You have symptoms that often occur with SAD, such as being very hungry (especially craving carbohydrates), gaining weight, and sleeping more than usual.
  • A close relative—a parent, brother, or sister—has had SAD.

You may need to have blood tests to rule out other conditions that can cause similar symptoms, such as low thyroid (hypothyroidism).

Your doctor may also suggest a mental health assessment to get a better idea of how you feel and how well you are able to think, reason, and remember.

Call the BRMC Access Center at 1.800.730.BRMC (2762) for assistance with diagnosing and treating SAD.

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